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Category Archives: Sissies

To Not Speak Up Is Moral Cowardice!

Christ Driving the Moneychangers from the Temp...

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There was so much wrong with Pat Robertson’s recent counsel  concerning divorce  that I could only summarize my thoughts by saying he was absolutely “whacked out!’

However, men of reputation have since weighed in to bring a more substantive approach to the issue. 

In this article below, Randy Alcorn does a fine job of declaring why we should speak up and why we must not be silent.

 Remember, as Jesus himself demonstrated with the money changers, prayer  should never to be viewed as a substitute for right action!

Alcorn gets it right when he says:

“To not speak up against what Robertson falsely spoke as a so-called representative of Christ would be, in my opinion, moral cowardice.” 

Enjoy!

 

 “When Christian leaders, who someone has no private access to, make public statements that aren’t minor or secondary errors but which undercut something as basic as the sanctity of life and the sanctity of marriage, it is not only appropriate but necessary to speak up.

The “judge not, just pray” approach some have advocated in the comments sounds virtuous. But in fact either what Pat Robertson said—heard now by 10s of millions of people in the network prime time news broadcasts—was true or it was not. It was either important or not. If it dishonored Christ, then my first obligation is to defend the truth of Jesus, not to defend the man who spoke a cruel and terrible untruth.

I am all for praying for Pat Robertson, and I have prayed for him. I have also prayed for those around him that they will step up and correct him and refuse to go along with this and other unbiblical statements he makes, even if it means losing their jobs. This is the loving thing to do for everyone, including Pat, because as Jesus said “But I tell you that men will have to give account on the day of judgment for every careless word they have spoken” (Matthew 12:36).

To not speak up against what Robertson falsely spoke as a so-called representative of Christ would be, in my opinion, moral cowardice. I speak against a brother’s words only with great sadness, but the alternative of silence is unacceptable, because silence connotes approval. And if by our silence we approve of the notion of a man divorcing his wife because she becomes mentally disabled, then God help the church.

Christians who care little about keeping sacred vows “for better or for worse, in sickness and in health, till death do us part” have nothing to offer the world or each other.”

http://takeyourvitaminz.blogspot.com/2011/09/russell-moore-on-cnn.html?

 
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Posted by on September 19, 2011 in divorce, Sissies

 

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Is Mark Driscoll a Bully?

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...

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The internet has been ablaze with Mark Driscoll being the lightning rod. Seems his convictional certitude regarding masculinity is not appreciated by a number of gender neutral proponents. Driscoll asked a “flippant” question about “effeminate anatomically male worship leaders” on  Facebook, and immediately drew fire from the offended.

Her~merneutics, a blog for women, posted this:

“The news of this post quickly drew responses from bloggers like Rachel Held Evans, who called Driscoll a bully, and Tyler Clark, who reflected on his own experience as an oft-labeled effeminate male. These responses consequently elicited counter-responses from writers like Anthony Bradley, who accused Evans of libel, only to be met with counter-counter-responses, such as Brian McLaren’s contribution to The Washington Post. The discussion finally culminated with Driscoll issuing his own response, admitting his comment was both “flippant” and failed to address “real issues with real content in a real context”

 Without apologizing, Driscoll responded by providing context for his question:

“I had a recent conversation with a stereotypical, blue-collar guy who drives his truck with his tools, lunchbox, and hard hat to his job site every day. He said he wasn’t a Christian, but he was open and wanted to learn what the Bible said. In that conversation, he told me he’d visited a church but that the guy doing the music made him feel uncomfortable because he was effeminate (he used another more colorful word, but that one will suffice in its place). He asked some questions about the Bible, and whether the Bible said anything about the kind of guy who should do the music. I explained the main guy doing the music in the Bible was David, who was a warrior king who started killing people as a boy and who was also a songwriter and musician.

I then put a flippant comment on Facebook, and a raging debate on gender and related issues ensued. As a man under authority, my executive elders sat me down and said I need to do better by hitting real issues with real content in a real context. And, they’re right. Praise God I have elders who keep me accountable and that I am under authority.”

http://theresurgence.com/2011/07/13/the-issue-under-a-lot-of-issues

http://blog.christianitytoday.com/women/2011/07/much_ado_about_mark_driscoll.html

http://rachelheldevans.com/mark-driscoll-bully

 

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10 Reasons Ministry and Sissies Are A Bad Mix

Pastor Tom Schaller preaching at GGWO

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“SBC Voices” tells it like it is! Realism vs Idealism. My own soul resounded with a hearty AMEN!Ministerial vocation isn’t for sissies, the weak of heart or the uncharactered.

rgh

“The blessings of ministry far outweigh the realities below; however, ministry is definitely not easy…If you enter pastoral ministry…”

10Not everyone will like you.
  9… You will make people angry regardless how godly you handle yourself; it comes with the position.
  8… You will feel like a failure often; and when you do appear to succeed, the fruit that is produced cannot be accredited to you. God alone gives the increase. Thus, there is little “sense of accomplishment in ministry” that you may be accustomed to in other vocations.
7 You will fight legalism and liberalism, along with laziness, ignorance, tradition, and opposition.
6  Not everyone will respond positively to your preaching, teaching, or leadership. You will bring people to tears with the same sermon: one in joy, another in anger (I have done this).
5… You will be criticized, rarely to your face, and frequently behind your back. This criticism will come from those that appear to love you, those that obviously do not like you, and pastors and Christians that barely know you.
4 You will think about quitting yearly or monthly, if not weekly or even daily.
3… You will be persecuted for preaching the truth, mostly from your brothers and sisters in the pews.
2… You will feel very lonely on a consistent basis, feeling like no one truly knows you or cares how you feel, because you do not want to burden your family, and trust-worthy peers are few and far in-between. Because of the “super-Christian” myth accredited to pastors literally, you will find it extremely difficult to disclose your deep thoughts and feelings to others. Thus, you will struggle with loneliness.
1… You will probably pastor a church that is barely growing (if at all), is opposed to change, doesn’t pay well, has seen pastors come and go, doesn’t respect the position as biblically as they should, doesn’t understand what the Bible says a pastor’s or a church’s jobs are, and will only follow you when they agree with you (thus, they’ll really only follow themselves).

related posts: http://redeemedministers.blogspot.com/2011/04/26-qualifications-for-minister.html

http://sbcvoices.com/10-reasons-why-sissies-and-pastoral-ministry-are-a-bad-mix

 
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Posted by on May 30, 2011 in character, criticism, influence, Ministry, quotes, Sissies

 

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