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Some Honest Questions for Joseph Prince

24 Dec

Dr Michael Brown is one of the most theologically astute polemicist in the charismatic community. He speaks with clarity and charity when thexposing the “hyper-grace” heresy. In doing so, he fulfills Jesus inspired imperative in the letter of Jude.

 “…contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints. For certain ungodly men… have crept into the church, perverting the grace of god by sanctioning unrestrained-unrepentant behavior which flagrantly denies the credibility of one’s confession in the Lordship of Jesus Christ”   [rghanner paraphrase]

Dr Brown is at his anointed best in his recent open letter which poses eleven penetrating questions to Joseph Prince, one of the chief proponents of the “hyper-grace “heresy. I’ve extracted a sampling so as to evoke further reading of the entire article.

>If God has pronounced your future sins forgiven in the same way He has pronounced your past sins forgiven, why do Paul and other New Testament writers address these very sins in their letters, and why does Jesus address them in Revelation 2-3? We know that God doesn’t bring our past sins up to us, since He has forgiven and “forgotten” them. Why then does He bring our present sins up to us in the New Testament, even warning us about the dangers of walking in those sins, if they have also been forgiven and forgotten in advance?

>A leading hyper-grace teacher claims that the doctrine of progressive sanctification is a “spiritually murderous lie.” Does that mean that grace preachers like Charles Spurgeon, who believed in progressive sanctification, taught this alleged lie? And if “progressive sanctification” simply means to walk out our holiness with the help of the Spirit, what is so dangerous about this teaching? Put another way, do you reject the concept that the one who made us holy now calls us to live holy lives in thought, word and deed, thereby “completing our sanctification in the fear of God” (2 Cor 7:1)? Doesn’t Paul say we are called saints (that is who we are) and called to be saints (that is how we live)? (See 1 Cor. 1:2.)

>Since you believe we are not to judge our salvation by our conduct, how can we avoid self-deception? I know that you are against certain types of self-examination lest you become “sin conscious” and take your eyes off the finished work of the cross, but what do you make of verses that state that we know we have passed from death to life only if we live a certain way (like 1 John 3:14)? If I understand you correctly, you would question the salvation of someone who demonstrated no change of life and continued to walk in unrepentant sin. But doesn’t this mean that, on some level, you are looking at your “performance” to verify your salvation?Do you see any possible danger in emphasizing that it is impossible for a believer to lose his or her salvation? Of course, we could debate whether the Bible teaches this at all, but simply as a matter of experience, many of us have encountered very lost people—drunkards, fornicators, without the slightest interest in God (see 1 Cor. 6:9-10)—who have then assured us that they were saved because it was impossible for them to lose their salvation. So on a practical level, do you feel it’s important to add any scriptural caveats to your teaching of eternal security and, if so, how can you do this without putting an emphasis on “performance”?

 

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One response to “Some Honest Questions for Joseph Prince

  1. Paul Bruning

    December 25, 2015 at 10:58 am

    Sounds very eerily similar to Carlton Pearson’s “Doctrine of Inclusion” (Universalism) that he got booted out of fellowship with many Pentecostals a dozen or so years back.

     

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